Plaza Famila|June 30, 2012 9:13 pm

Tips for Beginning Writers

Older children who are learning to write sometimes need a little encouragement. And having the right tools can make this sometimes frustrating process much easier for both parents and children.

Here are some tips for improving your child’s writing and helping them learn to love and enjoy it.

• For beginning readers, simply let them enjoy the process of writing. Ask your child to write a story and let their imagination take flight. Or think about the subject he likes best, and ask him to write a few sentences about it.

• Don’t be overly critical. At the beginning, simply let your child express her feelings. Don’t stress out about capitals, punctuation marks, or spelling. These are skills that can easily be learned later.

• Write the abuelos. Have your child dictate a letter to you. Encourage them to keep it short and simple. You can the write the letter down and then have your child copy the words onto a separate sheet of paper, or on some fun stationery.

• Another great on-line resource is the ESL Writing Wizard. This site allows you to find writing practice worksheets or create your own. With this program you can create worksheets by modifying the paper layout, writing style (including print or cursive), letter size, line patterns and more. The only thing it doesn’t do is allow you to add accents (Boo!), so you may have to add those on your own.

• Start with cursive! Some children prefer to learn how to write in cursive first. Enter the Amazing – Incredible Handwriting Worksheet Maker! This program allows you to design your own handwriting worksheets and their cursive option connects the letters perfectly. It also uses the same cursive style that I used growing up, which I prefer to teach my kids. And the best part? This one recognizes foreign letters, accents, and punctuation marks!

Otherwise, this is a fabulous tool for homeschooling families, so check it out here.

 

Creative commons-licensed photo provided by dotmatchbox.

Comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Tags:
  • Share this post:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Margarita

    This makes me realize how poor of a teacher I make for my child… I thought I was helping her by correcting all the capitals, punctuation marks, and spelling and I wasn’t thinking what that might do to her self-confidence. I think I know why she no longer enjoys studying with me and I think I need to teach myself how to be a good teacher before I try this again. I feel so terrible about this but I’m glad I got to realize it at least now.

  • Alfonso Rodrigo

    I’m trying to get more involved in my daughter’s daily activities and I think I’m going to teach her how to write. I work fulltime and it’s been difficult to make time for her on a regular basis, but that’s not good enough of an excuse for a father. I didn’t really know how to go about this but after reading your article I think I have a good idea on how I’m going to get her started. Thanks Monica.

  • jenna tomaszewski

    I learned cursive in elementary school and other then my signature I have yet to use it again. I feel like its a waste of time as its not used ever. Writing about something the child loves will ensure lots of potential materials. The idea of writing to the grandparents is great. The children will look forward to a reply and grandparents love getting to hear about the events in their beloved grand kids life.