As summer is upon us, the minds of students often gravitate towards things like swimming, bike riding, cartoons and long days spent outside. Many school districts fear that this time away from school can set students back considerably come September. Summer reading lists are quite common, and some schools even provide more structured work over the break, such as a math packet or a writing assignment.

Of course, students, parents, and school staff have varying opinions on this subject. Teachers may feel that such summer work is necessary so that they do not need to spend considerable class time getting kids “back up to speed.” A summer assignment or two can help keep student minds going and learned material fresh.

It is common for students to prefer to have summer to themselves, but they are often met with a summer reading list. This is really not something that should trouble your child. If you encourage reading in general, this is an easy way to continue to do so. Also, summer reading lists provide choices, so your son or daughter can pick the literature that is most interesting.

There are organizations that promote summer reading in different ways. For example, Barns and Noble, Scholastic, and The BOOK IT Program offer free books, prizes and other incentives to get kids reading over the summer. You can sign up and start by visiting their websites listed below. Also below is the link to a great Pinterest page for “Dream Big Read,” which is the 2012 summer reading theme promoted by many states.

Feel free to chime in with your thoughts! Should students have the summer totally to themselves or is a certain amount of school-related responsibility a good thing?

 

http://www.scholastic.com/summer/

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/u/summer-reading/379003570

http://bookitprogram.com/SummerBreak/default.html

http://pinterest.com/summerreading/kids-summer-reading-in-libraries-dream-big-read/

 

 Creative Commons-licensed photo provided by andy_carter.

 

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