Kindergarden, Plaza Famila, Pre-K, Primero - 1st|June 11, 2012 12:12 pm

“If You Give a Mouse a…. Cause and Effect Book”

Standard PK.RI.9: With prompting and support, students will compare and contrast two stories relating to the same topic

Rationale:  Students will learn that if you give this mouse anything, he will always want something else!  Cause and effect is a difficult skill at any age; luckily this mouse gives plenty of examples!

Materials: “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie” & “If You Take a Mouse to a Movie” books by Laura Joffe Numeroff

2 pre-made construction paper charts per kid (cause on one side and effect on the other) for each book

Mouse cut outs and other decorating materials

2 pieces of chart paper

Model:  Boys and girls, today we are going to read two stories, one called “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie” and the other one called “If You Take a Mouse to the Movies.”  In both of these stories, the main character is the same; the mouse!  It will be our job today to figure out what the mouse gets (such as a cookie) and then what the mouse wants (a glass of milk).  This is called cause and effect.  (Show the students the pre-made poster for this story as seen above.)  I know that if I’m biting into a very large chocolate chip cookie, I would want a glass of milk, too!  However, this mouse starts to get a little greedy as the story goes on so pay attention to all of the things he wants after he is given the thing he asks for!

In the second story, “If You Take a Mouse to the Movies,” what do you think that the mouse might get while he is at the movies?  Popcorn, right!  After he gets his popcorn, what do you think the mouse will want?  A drink to wash it down with! Your right!  Again, keep track of all of the things that the mouse is given and the things that he wants because of this.

Guided Practice:  As we read each story, we will make a list on chart paper to help us keep track of all the mouse’s wants/needs because, as you will see, they will add up to a pretty big list!  Be thinking about what items you will want to put on your own cause/effect posters.  Now, let’s click on those listening ears and start reading!  (Stop throughout the story to ask comprehension questions and add causes/effects to the chart paper).

Independent Practice:  After each story is finished, allow students to go back to their spots to create the cause and effect posters.  This may be a little timely; however, it will allow students to take a break from listening.

Assessment:  After the students are done listening to both stories and making his/her posters, talk about what the students think a cause/effect relationship is from their own life and document these on chart paper.  For example, “I lost a tooth (cause) so the tooth fairy gave me a dollar (effect).”

 

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