Finding (and Making) Teachable Moments


Sometimes teachable moments happen at home. When they do, it’s a powerful way to reach a child because they don’t even know they are being taught! If they are interested in what is happening, kids will naturally be paying attention to the information presented to them.

 

You should always be on the lookout for a teachable moment, but you can also plan to create them so you don’t have to wait around for one to appear on its own. Below are some suggestions for intentionally created teachable moments. It is likely that you will do these things with your kids anyway, so why not work in an important lesson!

 

Weather:

If you are planning a day out or just want to know the upcoming weather, let your child look into it. Weather sites online really offer a lot. You can study live maps, track weather patterns, inspect precipitation percentages, compare temperatures and wind speeds, and much more. With a little guidance, your junior meteorologist can learn about science and math while checking out the weather forecast.

 

Cooking:

Kids can enjoy helping out with the cooking or baking, and it gives them a chance to be an important part of the household as well. Cooking lets a child work on a variety of important skills. They’ll practice literacy as they read a cook book or product labels. They’ll do math as they work with numbers and cooking time lengths. They’ll also get hands on experience measuring food products. It’s a fun way to bond, learn, and of course create something tasty!

 

Money:

A great way to teach financial responsibility is to let learners handle money for themselves. Think about giving your child a small box or a checkbook case in which to keep his or her money. Include a ledger where they can keep track of debits and credits. This is especially appropriate if your child gets a scheduled allowance. When they put money in, they add to the total. When they spend money, they subtract from the total. It’s a practical way to have kids do some math and also keep track of their finances at all times.

 

Grocery Shopping:

This is another way to teach your child about money. You can talk to your kids about the grocery budget and compare prices at the stores. Older kids can even help you find the unit price of products. Then they can determine how much each ounce of food costs in similar products to see which is really the best deal. A trip to the grocery store can also be an opportunity to teach about health and nutrition. The produce section and any fresh food section are definitely hot spots for healthy food. When shopping for packaged foods, have your child look at the nutrition labels so you can make an informed purchase together. You can also learn a lot at your local farmers market. Here, children can learn about small business. You can talk to your kids (or the vendors) about the various products local areas produce. It’s also a good place to explore and learn about new things. Be daring and try an unfamiliar fruit, vegetable. Dragon fruit anyone?

 

 

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  • http://www.facebook.com/jenna.tomaszewski.35 Jenna Tomaszewski

    These are great ways to provide teaching opportunities to your children that will help get them ready for adult life. These options provide great opportunitys for learning as children love helping their parents wanting to be part of the grown up world. They are so eager, they eat everything up!

  • Marcus

    It’s a well known fact that children’s little brains are like sponges, they just absorb everything! Teaching them and asking them leading questions at a young age is a good way for them to develop their thinking and problem solving skills. Simple stuff like adding and subtracting or counting how many buses they see on the way to wherever your going is enough to get them going!